File I/O Part 1

I love to learn and try new languages. Not only is learning a new language fun, many times it teaches me something new about a language that I am already familiar with. The only problem that I have with learning so many languages, is keeping them straight. I decided that I would take a few of the dynamic languages I use most often and compile a list of how to handle File I/O with each of them. If you have a Dynamic language(part 2 of this post will be on static languages) not represented below or have another method of File I/O with the represented languages, please add to the list with its respective File I/O code:D
Without further ado…

//Groovy open file for writing
def target ="filename"
File wf= new File(target)
wf.write( "I am in your file eating your space" )

//Groovy one liner
new File('filename.txt').text = 'First line of text!'

//Groovy open file for appending
def target ="filename"
File af= new File(target)
af.append("I have all of your base")

//Groovy read each line in file
new File("filename").eachLine{line-> println line}

//Groovy read whole document and put into List

List lines = new File("filename").readLines()
//lines contains two lines that we need
println "first line  $lines[0]"
println "second line $lines[1]"

//Groovy reading one line
File rf= new File("filename") //open for reading
//read first line, trim, assign to tmp
rf.withReader { line ->tmp = line.readLine().trim()}

//Groovy test if file exists
File src = new File(srcFile)
if (src.exists() ){ println "I exist"}
else{println "I don't exist"}

#Ruby openfile for reading
fh = File.new(path, "r")  # open file "path" for reading only
fh.close

#Ruby open file for writing
fout   = File.new(path, "w")  # open file "path" for writing only
fout.puts "Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Select, Start"
fout.close

#Ruby open file for apending
fa= File.new("DeleteMe.txt","a")
fa.puts "I am at the end of file"
fa.close

#Ruby read eachline in a file
File.open("file").each { |line| p line}

#Ruby read entire file to string
fh = File.new(filename)
str = fh.read

#Ruby read entire file into array(each line is an element in the array)
fh = File.new(filename)
str = fh.readlines

#Python Write a file
fout = open("DeletMe.txt", "w")
fout.write("Writing to fout\nCheck it out!")
fout.close()

#Python Read an entire file
fin = open("ReadingTest.txt", "r")
fin_text =  fin.read()
fin.close()
print fin_text

#Python read entire file into list
fin = open("ReadingTest.txt", "r")
txt= fin.readlines()
fin.close()
print txt[0]

#Python append to a file
fh= open ( 'DeleteMe.txt', 'a' )
fh.write ( '\n\n\nBottom line.' )
fh.close()

#Perl reading a file
open(FILE,  '<', $file) or die "Can't read $file: $!\n";
while(<FILE>)
{
print ;
}

#Perl append to a file
open(FILE, '>>', $file) or    die "Can't append to $file: $!\n";
print FILE "text";
close(FILE);

#Perl read and write to a file
#+< allows reading and writing, and keeps the data that was
#already in the file.  open() will fail if file doesn't exist.
open(FILE, "+<$file" ) or die ("Can't  read|write: $file\n");
close(FILE);

#Perl read and write to a file
#+>allows writing and reading, but replaces/overwrites the
#data in the file if the file exists. Creates it if it doesn't exist.
open(FILE, "+>$file" ) or die ("Can't write or read:$file \n");

close(FILE);

PHP code doesn’t display properly within WordPress, so here is an image of the code

PHP File I/O

4 thoughts on “File I/O Part 1

  1. Another way to get the first two items of the list containing the lines of the file would be using a range as in:

    lines[0..1].eachWithIndex{ it, i -> println “{i+1}: $it” }

    would provide the output:

    1: line 1 String contents
    2: line 2 String contents

    if you don’t need the index value then use the following
    lines[0..1].each{ println it }

    would provide the output:

    line 1 String contents
    line 2 String contents

    I enjoyed the language comparisons. Of course, my favorite is Groovy because it is very Java like and integrates will all the existing Java libraries but supports more flexibility than Java.

  2. anybody here know of a good site to find more info on Php Perl? I’ve got this site bookmarked and im gonna keep checking it out, but i still would like to find a site that covers Php Perl a little more thoroughly..thanks

  3. Pingback: japan searches
  4. Thanks for info. It is sometimes quite difficult to convert some program from one language to another. Such comparisons come in very handy.

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